Tuesday Tips 29/01/19 - Avoiding Plastic


#1

I wanna reduce my plastic usage, but disorganisation is my downfall. For example, instead of meal planning like a grown up, I’ll end up grabbing like 3 bags of Cheestrings (individually wrapped, the horror) in Tesco on the way home from work.

Hit me up with your easiest tips for a lazy girl :raised_hands:


#2

I find that if you watch the silent images of literally ,sea of plastic, floating in the sea, or oceans, or down the rivers…well…that kind of image concentrates your mind, and you do start to make very deliberate changes in your life. Good luck, stefania


#3

Thanks Stefania - are there any particular docs or films you’d recommend? :slightly_smiling_face:


#4

I like the ones that show normal people becoming inventive as to how to remove-reduce plastic in their lives

Life without plastic is such short film

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=documentaries+about+plastic+on+netflix&view=detail&mid=5DB9C91F151B457143385DB9C91F151B45714338&FORM=VIRE


#5

You’re so right, @stefania. Visuals can work miracles. Climate Outreach has an interesting project, Climate Visuals, where you can find out more about the importance of images in changing behavior. I know, the project is about climate, but it’s easy to see the parallels with the plastic crisis.

I’m also very fond of The Story of Stuff Project. They focus on stuff, in general, not only plastic, but you can imagine that plastic occupies a big chunk of their work. Anyone trying to explain plastic to schoolchildren, for instance, should have a look at their resources page. Among other useful things, they produce these short but rather comprehensive animations explaining how plastics (but not only) are produced and what happens to them after we throw them away.


#6

:raising_hand_woman:t2: hiya - also do you want some recipes to help out?


#7

Hey @Ioana.S! What kind of recipes? :smiley:


#8

This is fresh :slight_smile: Emily from Camden Friends of the Earth just shared her journey to a plastic free life :raised_hands: You’ll find some handy tips.


#9

Was thinking of recipes which you can make in big batches and freeze up.
I also found this useful https://onceamonthmeals.com/blog/series/get-started/foods-that-freeze-well/ :slight_smile:
Otherwise, you can find recipes which can be cut down in half very easily (if you are cooking for one).
I will have a look during weekend and share some recipes if anyone interested :slight_smile:

( I haven’t bought lunch in more than 2 years, but to be honest it does require effort)


#10

Sounds great! Thanks for the link! Most people don’t know there are ways to freeze glass jars too :smiley: The Zero Waste Chef has some good tips on this topic too.

@Ioana.S, you can start your own topic if you want. It could be aimed at those of us desperate to ditch the over-packaged-processed-humble-but-expensive sandwich :smiley: Your 2 years of no take-away lunch would make a great intro :slight_smile: Thanks!


#11

Thanks for sharing @stefania ! :relaxed:

I watched the doc, and, idk, it seems a bit extreme to me. Liiiike, is it really worth throwing away your kids’ favourite toys when they’re going to come into contact with plastic literally everwhere else in the world anyway?!


#12

Climate Visuals is such a simple, clever idea to convey the human impact of climate change - particularly because if you search “climate change” on Google images, this is the 2nd result, lmaooooo


#13

As someone who buys lunch almost every day, this would be a massive help! Please do share! :see_no_evil:


#14

Hi,
NO! I d say never throw them away: the ones you have( toys), keep them and hand them down thru generations, :grin: but, essentially, never ever buy more.

The older the kids grow, the more they ll understand the reasoning behind the actions.


#15

Again, I didn’t see the film, but it sounds to me like communication breakdown. Who bought the plastic in the first place? I’m a great believer in reusing stuff. You did not know how harmful plastic is, fine, now you know and won’t buy new plastic toys, but there’s no point throwing them away when a kid can still play with them. Does it make sense?

If they’re beyond repair, recycle them (although most plastic toys don’t get recycled), or give them to someone who has some interesting upcycling ideas.

Good to know that some big toy companies are planning to change their ways. Lego, for instance, wants to use only plant-based materials in the near future.

I know parents who only buy sustainable toys or make the toys together with the kids (now that sounds like fun!). I’ll ask them for some tips.


#16

wow, this is so bad :smiley: I don’t even know what it is, or what it means :thinking: That’s probably the Sun exploding?!

Climate Visuals are all around us. We just need someone to point at them :slight_smile:


#17

Since disposable items are a problem, for those of you who shave, and don’t every want to buy and throw away plastic, you can try this:


#18

This is a gamechanger! :smiley:


#19

When I was growing up this was the only option. My father used the same metal razor for decades and just bought blades. Lately I noticed he’s been using the disposable plastic ones :frowning: One of the reasons is that in most shops where he lives, the disposable ones are the only option. ~But it’s worth sending a reminder :slight_smile: and maybe a gift :wink:
Thanks for the suggestion!


#20

Yes, I think the old school blades are harder to find in shops nowadays. Easy to find online though!